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Tag Archives: baby food

All in Good Taste…

If you are anything at all like me, eating occupies a lot of your time. Thinking about it, drooling over beautiful pictures of it, buying it, preparing it, and, of course, eating it…I know it’s not true for everyone, but for me and many of the people I know, food is really a passion.

If sight is our most human of senses, taste is probably our most social. We “break bread” together, we host a feast in celebration of major life landmarks and we offer food to our ancestors, gods and goddesses.

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Jook: It’s What’s for Breakfast

We’ve all heard words of wisdom regarding breakfast. Some call it the most important meal of the day, and in many ways it’s true. Breakfast sets the tone for the entire day. A favorite in our house in the autumn and winter is something called Jook, or Congee (or even Konyi, in South India).


One of the big mistakes that we often make with breakfast, is choosing something that essentially breaks down to sugar by the time it reaches the stomach. While your brain is actually fed by sugar, it’s much better for your body and the mind when that sugar is produced through the work of breaking down fats and proteins. Fats and proteins are long-term energy storage.


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Beet and Beef Borscht

Autumn has fully fallen in the Hudson Valley. The trees are aflame. Food-wise, this is my favorite time of year. It’s all about soups and stews…long, slow cooking and rich, deep flavors. Read more »

Winter Squash Soup

Ok, so you all know how I feel about bone broth, and while I think that it tastes great as a snack or a side dish to a meal, it also happens to be a super-delicious flavor and nutrition booster for any soup you make with it.

This time of year, with the abundance of winter squashes of all sorts, I love to make a blended soup. My favorite is a combination of butternut squash with a few other veggies, but kabocha, acorn, hubbard, delicata–any squash with flesh that gets smooth when cooked–will also taste great. Read more »

Bone Broth: Nectar of Health

Now that the weather has really become colder and windier, bone broths should begin again to make an appearance on our dinner tables (and lunch and breakfast too!).

Bone broth or stock forms a central part of traditional cuisines all over the world. Besides adding rich flavor, it brings a host of minerals and vitamins into the dishes cooked with it. Long-cooked bone stock also has gelatin and collagen in it which strengthen the bones, hair and nails and greatly aid digestion while soothing the digestive tract. Read more »

Mama Medicine: Fevers

This is the first in a series of posts on “Mama Medicine.” Each of these posts will offer an overview of a common childhood illness along with some suggestions for supporting the body in implementing it’s own healing wisdom. I am happy to try to honor suggestions or requests at any time. Also, if you have some wisdom to add, please feel free to comment below.

Fever

According to Ayurvedic legend, the god Shiva in his wrathful form as Rudra, gave birth to fever after a long spell of meditation. His focus had been disturbed by demons and in frustration he opened his third eye and burned them up with it’s laser-like beam. This points to the role of fever in burning up pathogens and other bodily burdens.

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Recipe: Fresh Green Peas

Milo’s new favorite activity in the kitchen is shelling fresh green peas.

This translates into lots of opportunities to cook and eat green peas, and this is our favorite so far.

Peas are a great food to introduce in this blended form after a baby has successfully eaten a simple porridge or bone broth and then  orange vegetables, but this recipe pleased the adults, too. It is great served with home made tortillas or chapatis, savory crepes or dosas, rice, fish or chicken (I’m probably forgetting some things). It could even be made in a more thinned out form for a great soup. Just add 3 extra cups of vegetable or meat stock (and maybe some more salt).

Green peas are sweet to taste, cooling and dry in nature and have a sweet post digestive effect. This means that they are pacifying to both Kapha and Pitta and not aggravating to Vata if they are cooked thoroughly. All of these factors make it a perfect food for the spring and summer time for the whole family.

Blended Green Peas with Leek and Fennel

(serves 4)

1 lb. fresh green peas in the shell (2 1/2 – 3 cups shelled)

1 c. sliced leek

1/4 c. sliced fresh fennel

3/4 tsp. salt (seasoned salt like Herbamare works nicely)

1 heaping Tbsp. ghee

1 Tbsp. olive oil

Shell the green peas and place them in a bowl. Discard the pods.

Add ghee and oil to a pan. Heat slightly and then add everything else to pan.

Saute until the leeks are soft and translucent. Cover with water and simmer over medium heat until the peas are soft–about 15-20 minutes.

Remove from heat and allow to cool a bit. Blend in blender or with hand mixer until they have a lumpy consistency, or until completely smooth.